Tag Archives: LGBT

The Phlip-side of the Phelps Phamily – Gay-friendly Nate! – Son of Dying Phred…

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Nate Phelps, Son of infamous hate-mongerer Fred.

Nate Phelps, Son of infamous hate-mongerer Fred.

Our hearts go out to the estranged children of infamous hate-mongerer Fred Phelps of the notorious Westboro Baptist Church, a pseudo-congregation made up primarily of members of his own family. Seems the old man, the patriarch of The Most Hated Family in America is dying. The father of thirteen children, four of those have severed ties. The man who terrorized funerals of AIDS victims and war victims with equal glee did not hold back with his own family. Son Nate Phelps has become an outspoken speaker on the topic of child abuse in religious organizations as well as an ally to and advocate for the Gay and Queer communities his father rallied against for so many years. Go, Nate! BTW, not all evil-ass cults are right wing. Religious abuse, like totalitarianism, can approach from the right OR the left. For a groovy take on THAT Cozmic Debris, just ask old Frank. Zappa, that is, baby snakes and yellow snow…

Bay Area American Indian Two Spirits (BAAITS) 2nd Annual Two Spirit Powwow!

Powwow

You’re invited: Bay Area American Indian Two Spirits (BAAITS) 2nd Annual Two Spirit Powwow!

This year’s event will take place Saturday, February 2nd in Oakland, starting at noon. For directions and more information, visit the BAAITS website.

Last year’s groundbreaking powwow attracted over 500 people, and made history as the first and only public Two Spirit Powwow in the world.

A Powwow is a public gathering with Native dancing and drums, seeing friends and family. It is a cultural event, large and crowded at times, yet intimate. It holds a place in the hearts of the Native community, and BAAITS offering up this Powwow in the name of Two Spirit peoples is truly an honoring. The overwhelming response of our allies honors and recognizes the work and important role of the Two Spirit community.

We welcome all Two Spirit people as well as allies. Come one, come all. All dancers and Drums are invited to join us. Special dance categories this year will include a Switch Dance (Women take on the male roles, and vice-versa) and a Duct Tape Special, in which the dance regalia is made of duct tape and found objects. There will be contests for dancers, fry bread and Indian tacos, crafts and gifts for sale, a raffle, and most of all – community!

Hey, Gay Artists! We want to see your Stuff!! QCC presents ZEITGEIST – Big Queer Time Art Show!

GHZeitgeist

 

 

 

 

 

Zeitgeist

Juried Exhibition
SOMArts Gallery
June 1 – 30, 2013
San Francisco, CA

CALL FOR ART
Zeitgeist Exhibition
Zeitgeist Market
Deadline: January 15, 2013
Contact: Zeitgeist@queerculturalcenter.org

Scholars have long maintained that each era has a unique spirit, a nature or climate that sets it apart from all other epochs. In German, such a spirit is known as “Zeitgeist,” from the German words “Zeit,” meaning “time,” and “Geist,” meaning “spirit” or “ghost.” Some writers and artists assert that the true zeitgeist of an era cannot be known until it is over, and several have declared that only artists or philosophers can adequately explain it. While we are not setting out to define a Queer Zeitgeist, the exhibition will expose and comment on manifestations of our cultural moment.

We are looking for artistic expressions that reflect or critique the intellectual, ethical and cultural climate of our queer times.

We hope to present trends in queer arts such as: queer craft, traditional as well as experimental works of painting, drawing, and sculpture, work that foregrounds emotional content and/or performance over formal aesthetics, new ways of representing the erotic, the body, gender and identity, reflections on the queer archive, ideas of domesticity, new ways of thinking about public and private space, queer time, remixed and repurposed work including collage and assemblage, eco/environmental work, the return to analog, all things digital, networked art, manifestations of social practice, relational work, collaborative work, activist art, interventions, propaganda, new approaches to film and video, audio art. International artists that offer a global perspective on queer art making are strongly encouraged to apply.

All media and artistic practices will be considered.

Zeitgeist Market

As part of our exhibition we are creating a one-day art market. If you have an idea, product, craft or performative engagement that you’d like to sell/exchange in our market please describe your product and/or exchange system. Please make it clear in your proposal that you want to be in the Zeitgeist Market.

HOW TO SUBMIT YOUR Work
DEADLINE: January 15, 2013

Please send the following to: Zeitgeist@queerculturalcenter.org

1. Please send visual documentation of previous work or work in progress. You may submit 2 to 5 jpegs, video links to YouTube or Vimeo or web links to images or projects. Please carefully label your images beginning with your last name and image number (example: Lastname_Image1.jpg).

2. Please include a Work Sample list describing each sample. (Title, Date, Medium)

2. If you are submitting a proposal for an installation please submit a detailed description and plan for your project including rough dimensions and any special hardware or rigging requirements.

3. For all other non-traditional media, please submit a proposal no longer that 2 pages with an appropriate work sample that will help the curators understand your idea. Please feel free to contact the exhibition coordinator if you are uncertain about what to submit. Zeitgeist@queerculturalcenter.org

4. A brief resume

5. A brief statement explaining how your work addresses the exhibition’s theme. How does your work reflect or critique the intellectual, ethical and cultural climate of our queer times.

Please send your submission via email to Zeitgeist@queerculturalcenter .org

Our Mailing Address is:

Queer Cultural Center (Qcc)
c/o African American Art and Culture Complex
762 Fulton Street
San Francisco, CA 94102

Note: Arrangements and expenses for shipping/delivery/retrieval are the responsibility of the artist. All non-installation must arrive/be delivered “ready to hang.” Artworks are insured by the gallery from the time they enter the gallery until they leave.

Big Queer Art Show! ReMix: ReFraming Appropriation at SOMArts – QCC’s 15th Anniversary

It’s Big. It’s Queer. It’s Arty as All Get Out. It’s ReMix: Reframing Appropriation at SOMArts Gallery, and it’s opening Friday and running through June.

Join the Queer Cultural Center in a Reunion of 15 years of visual arts programs housed at SOMArts!  There will, of course, be libations to take us into the next 15 years and special recognition of those who have participated in exhibitions from FACE (1998) to QIY (2011) and the curators, funders and supporting organizations that made these shows happen!

Wear your best outfits, pick up your nametags at the door and come back to SOMArts for a fabulous Visual Arts Reunion!

ReMix: ReFraming Appropriation mines 15 years of National Queer Arts Festival exhibitions towards understanding the centrality of the act of appropriation for queer art of the recent past.  Using appropriation as its lens, it sifts through all the art exhibited over the last 15 years, selecting those works for redisplay that map the parameters of queer appropriation as it has evolved through to today.

Curated by Jonathan D. Katz, former Board Member and one of the first curators of the National Queer Arts Festival, ReMix: ReFraming Appropriation in essence appropriates years of appropriations in order to both articulate and enact how queer politics so often turns on making familiar images and ideas ventriloquize new politics, new identities, and new utopias. This show revisits some of the many powerful works exhibited since the inception of the National Queer Arts Festival 15 years ago and remixes them in an effort to isolate a key theme of queer art making since at least the 1990s: appropriation. Appropriation—taking over of an extant cultural form to make it speak in a new voice—has long been a queer strategy. It’s a way of remaking dominant culture from within, as queers often do; most of us were born of a straight world, yet found a way to carve out meanings that spoke to us even if they were not intended by the larger culture. Notably, the exhibition is itself an example of the phenomenon it investigates, for it appropriates previous exhibitions–and curatorial visions–to new effect, allowing these varied works, all previously seen, to return in a new form, with new meanings. It queers the queer.

Malay Gays face Conservative Islamic Foes…but are backed by Islamic Renaissance Friends

As Malaysia moves into its election season, religious conservatives in the Islamic majority country are using the “proliferation of the LGBT problem” as a political weapon. According to an article in the Bay Area Reporter: “A large anti-LGBT demonstration is scheduled in Dataran Merdeka Square, Kuala Lumpur on April 21.” That is Saturday. Gay Malaysians have good reason for concern. They also have some interesting friends. House speaker Pandikar Amin Mulia recently rejected a motion that would have banned LGBT people from serving in Parliament. International outcry derailed a move to ban representation of unconventional sexualities in publicly funded media. And Dr. Ahmad Fuad Rahmat of the Islamic Renaissance Front is explicit in his support. He says, in a passionate defense of the (successfully) banned Queer Arts Festival Seksualiti Merdeka: “We are living in a heterogeneous society full of diversity. In order for a society to mature, it must be able to remodel itself to be inclusive in nature. There should be no discrimination based on gender or sexual orientation, irrespective of race and religion. Every single citizen has the right to live and express his or her conviction without fear.” Hear, hear! Click here for the entire text. As of this writing, sodomy is punishable in Malaysia by up to twenty years in prison. For something fun and sexy (homoerotic sandwich cookies!) from Malaysia, here.

HuffPost Gay Voices: Liberian Anti-Gay Group Issues Hit List, Governments Do Nothing

This disturbing story from Liberia on Huffington Post reveals that an anti-gay group in the country has published a “hit list” of LGBT advocates that they would like to kill. More disturbing, perhaps, is the complete silence of elected officials around the issue. According to Huffington Post, Liberia’s president Ellen Johnson Sirleaf vowed

to preserve an existing law criminalizing “voluntary sodomy”.

Also disappointing to me, as a US citizen, is the lack of response from the US embassy in Monrovia. International pressure has certainly been helpful in compelling governments to be accountable around human rights issues in the past.
I’m hoping Liberian LGBT advocates will comment on this issue soon – I will publish updates as I get them.
-AidanAbroad

Gay Human Rights Website banned in Indonesia!

IGLHRC E.D. Cary Alan Johnson

The IGLHRC website has been banned in Indonesia.

Statement from Cary Alan Johnson, Executive Director, International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission:

“This is not the first time that attempts to organize and educate lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people and their allies have been met with state censorship. All too often, governments use the charge of pornography as a smokescreen to attack freedom of expression. Oppressive governments can’t stop the tide of LGBT voices—whether they are on the Internet, in the media or on the streets. IGLHRC stands with human rights defenders in Indonesia in their struggle to keep the web free for dialog on basic human rights issues.

According to a spokesperson for the internet service provider IM2, the order came from the Minister of Communication and Information who … banned [the website] due to it’s content which, they determined contains pornography.

Subsequently, Indonesian LGBT activists who tried to access the website reported that they had received the following message: Site inaccessible. The site you wish to open cannot be accessed. (Situs tidak bisa diakses. Situs yang hendak Anda buka tidak dapat diakses.)

Web censorship in Indonesia is frequent but is neither well organized nor uniform and depends on the operator and their respective location. Therefore, with word that they had been banned, IGLHRC reached out to dozens of activists in Indonesia who investigated the accessibility of the website. Indonesian activists confirmed that they were unable to access the IGLHRC website. Many reported they were denied accessibility.

Specifically, IGLHRC was censored in Jakarta (Telkomsel, Indosat, 3), Bandung (Telkomsel, XL), Palembang, South Sumatra, Surabaya (XL), Salatiga, Central Java as well as other areas. Censoring operators include Telkomsel, Indosat (IM-3), Three, XL Axiata, and Telkom Speedy. Only First Media, a small cable operator consistently refused to ban the site.