Category Archives: Indigenous cultures

Strange and sexy shelf Life – Dad of Dads and soiled Spanking…seriously.

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Good schooling on how to make and keep stuff clean. Multiple editions, this one is early, plus limited vintage xerox and plus one – one-off paint over 19 c print. Quality, condition and display make a hoard into an exhibit. Oh, yeah. That plus what the shit sells for. D’uh. So Sez Homer and the Homo-ner and thee Prophat…heh…

Haiku to you, too…

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Monday in the sink
Two days later, it’s full blown
Old Zuni summer

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Bay Area American Indian Two Spirits (BAAITS) 2nd Annual Two Spirit Powwow!

Powwow

You’re invited: Bay Area American Indian Two Spirits (BAAITS) 2nd Annual Two Spirit Powwow!

This year’s event will take place Saturday, February 2nd in Oakland, starting at noon. For directions and more information, visit the BAAITS website.

Last year’s groundbreaking powwow attracted over 500 people, and made history as the first and only public Two Spirit Powwow in the world.

A Powwow is a public gathering with Native dancing and drums, seeing friends and family. It is a cultural event, large and crowded at times, yet intimate. It holds a place in the hearts of the Native community, and BAAITS offering up this Powwow in the name of Two Spirit peoples is truly an honoring. The overwhelming response of our allies honors and recognizes the work and important role of the Two Spirit community.

We welcome all Two Spirit people as well as allies. Come one, come all. All dancers and Drums are invited to join us. Special dance categories this year will include a Switch Dance (Women take on the male roles, and vice-versa) and a Duct Tape Special, in which the dance regalia is made of duct tape and found objects. There will be contests for dancers, fry bread and Indian tacos, crafts and gifts for sale, a raffle, and most of all – community!

Frozen Antarctic Bear Blows Seal?

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Reminds us of a joke about an Eskimo. Cool cause of icy specificity…not racially insulting, could be a Lapp or any polar dude with a broken snowmobile. The repairman tells him: “Man, looks like you blew a seal…” and polar dude responds: “Oh, no! Not at all! That’s just frost on my moustache!”

From the 125th Anniversary Edition of National Geographic. Congrats to an ancient and noble photographic publication!

Min the Mighty Old Rock-hard God

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This 3000-plus year old limestone monolith is over life-size and honors Min, an Egyptian male fertility god whose worship preceded the dynastic era and which continued through it.

Happy Homoerotic Thanksgiving Day …1928!

These two staunch white guys look about ready to eat each other up. Looks like the pilgrim has already started to unwrap the football player. TV didn’t link the holiday to the sport after all. Something seems to be missing from this scenario, though. Where are the First Nation studs? Maybe planning a little dessert entertainment for these two…all in good, clean fun. Of course.

Shoot! (for the Stars…)

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Seen on the side of an electrical box in rural Mendocino County, just north of Ft. Bragg. Check out his giant Indian Club

To Maya and to Maya and to Maya…in to 2012.

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A Bizarro comic by Dan Piraro.

Ill Eagle Fireworks

Cool sign seen on an urban reservation in Washington state (Puyallup, I think?): Ill Eagle Fireworks.
-AidanAbroad

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Waru! Martu Aboriginal Art at Stanford

Tomorrow (Thursday) 5-7pm is the opening of an exciting new art exhibition at Stanford. Several Martu Aboriginal artists (who I had the good fortune to stay with and learn from in Parnngurr Aboriginal Community in 2009) are exhibiting their strikingly beautiful paintings of their homeland, Western Australia’s Pilbara region.

Here is a description of the show provided by Doug Bird, a Stanford anthropologist who has been working with the Martu for over 10 years:

“Waru! Holding fire in Australia’s Western Desert – a unique exhibition merging science and indigenous art marking the lived relationships among indigenous Martu of Australia’s Western Desert; their foraging economy, ritual arts, the expression of these on the landscape, and their links to desert biodiversity. The nexus of these relationships is distilled in the concept and practice of waru, which translates as fire. Here, Martu have chosen the title of the exhibition for its many meanings: Martu artists are cultural ambassadors, to spread, like fire, knowledge of their heritage and land; moreover, Martu artists are the literal agents of fire, applying fire to their country in the course of their daily foraging practice, resulting in the maintenance of key components of arid grassland biodiversity.

“Stanford University researchers have been working with Martu people and communities for more than ten years, on projects that are central to the cultural, social and creative universe of Martu people, including land use, fire, flora and fauna and the intersection of these physical phenomena with the mythological and metaphysical worldviews of the Martu. It is from the same interplay between these forces that the stories, content and confidence to produce exceptional art is derived.

“This exhibition at Thomas Welton Stanford Art Gallery is the result of a three year collaboration between Stanford University and Martumili Artists. It showcases the extraordinary depth and range of work being produced by the Martu artists and educates audiences about how these paintings describe the physical, religious, political and familial worlds of the Martu.”

Come check out the show if you can! Details about where & when are embedded in the promotional poster below.

-AidanAbroad

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